mintCast 221 – MakuluLinux and the LMDE2 RC

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mintCast 220 – Martin Wimpress and Ubuntu MATE

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mintCast 219 – Bodhi Linux and Chromebooks

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mintCast 196 – Looking at LMDE

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mintCast 193 – A New User’s View of Mint

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mintCast 192 – It’s Elementary

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  • Why Did Linux Mint Ax mintConstructor? Linux Mint has given Reglue the opportunity to create a respin for educational purposes within their non-profit, largely due to an app named mintConstructor. It provides a fairly simple method of making custom systems using Linux Mint as the base. (fossforce.com)
  • Ubuntu Planning To Develop Its Own File Manager The latest piece of the desktop Linux stack that Ubuntu developers are planning to replace with their own home grown solution is a file manager. (phoronix.com)
  • LibreOffice 4.2 released;  better bridges the gap with Microsoft Office Improved Office compatibility, OpenCL-powered spreadsheet math, and more features round out latest update of the open source productivity suite.  (infoworld.com)
  • UK government plans switch from Microsoft Office to open source Ministers are looking at saving tens of millions of pounds a year by abandoning expensive software produced by firms such as Microsoft.  Some £200m has been spent by the public sector on the computer giant’s Office suite alone since 2010. (theguardian.com)
  • Shotwell, elementary, and Pantheon Photos: What it all means Quote from the article… “To be clear, Yorba remains the maintainer of Shotwell.  elementary has not taken it over.” (yorba.org)
  • Podcasting “patent troll” fighting EFF wants donors’ names Personal Audio LLC is a patent-holding company that became famous (or infamous, depending on one’s point of view) by claiming that it owns things like playlists and podcasts (or “episodic content,” in the words of one Personal Audio patent). Its wild claims led the Electronic Frontier Foundation to raise more than $76,000 from donors to fight the patent. (arstechnica.com)

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