mintCast 216 – Linux Mint 17.1 KDE and Xfce

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News:

Linux Mint 17.1 KDE and Xfce Editions

Website:

Tip:

  • sudo dpkg-reconfigure tzdata – you can use this command to quickly change your timezone.  It runs an ncurses based utility that harkens back to the days of text based Linux installers.

Pre-Show Music:

Podcast Announcements:

More Information:

Hosts: Rob, Scott, and Joe
Live Stream every other Sunday 2:00 p.m.(Central): mintcast.org/livestream

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More Linux Mint info: website, blog, forums, community

Credits:

Podcast Entry and exit music provided by Mark Blasco (podcastthemes.com). Podcast bumpers provided by Oscar. 

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11 thoughts on “mintCast 216 – Linux Mint 17.1 KDE and Xfce

  1. My 10 yr old son wanted the KDE version of Mint 17.1 installed on his hand me down Eee PC Netbook. Much to my surprise, it operates perfectly and is still robust. I thought the little machine wouldn’t be able to handle the KDE envenvironment, but I was wrong. Very impressive Mint crew!

    • That’s pretty cool for KDE is known to be pretty heavy. I am rather surprised that it worked well for you as well since I am familliar with the modest of the eee netbook

  2. Hi Guys.

    I upgraded to Mint 17.1 Xfce a few days before I listened the podcast, and I just want to say I LIKE the fact that the upgrade dialog launched a web browser to display the blurb.

    Who can really say they prefer reading lengthy text in a tiny window, as opposed to a nice browser where we can control window and font size?

    Is it really so difficult to ALT-TAB (or CTRL-ALT-LEFT/RIGHT between desktops) to return to the original upgrade dialog? (hint: no, it isn’t 🙂 )
    ____________________

    On another subject… PC gaming vs. console gaming (Joe’s remarks in the podcast).

    I’m not a hardcore gamer but my son (17 yrs) is, and he does it all on a Windows machine.

    Until last summer he used a six-year-old PC (4GB memory, medium spec Nvidia card). As he’s off to university in September this year, we splashed out on a i7 laptop with SSD, 16GB memory and high-end Nvidia.

    He plays a range of games: WoW, LoL, Skyrim, Planetside 2, Guildwars, Rome II, StarWars Battlefront, several others. Mostly he’s into the MMO and strategy/wargaming variety, where a keyboard and mouse are exactly right for the job. An Xbox-style USB game pad does the trick for the games that need it.

    The idea of switching to a games console would never cross his mind. In fact, I’m pretty sure I heard that, after several years of console dominance, PC gaming is making a comeback.

    Keep up the good work.

    –Thomas.

  3. On another subject… I think Rob will be interested in this Kickstarter project…

    “Flotilla for Raspberry Pi – Making for Everyone”

    Looks great. I’m a backer 🙂

  4. I’m the lead developer of Ubuntu MATE. I’ve been listening to mintCast since before I started working on Ubuntu MATE because, among other things, I’m a member of the core MATE Desktop team.

    Ubuntu MATE has been mentioned on mintCast a few times now and the sentiment is starting to imply that Ubuntu MATE intending to supplant Linux Mint MATE. This is not an objective of the project.

    The reason I started Ubuntu MATE was to recreate the traditional Ubuntu experience for my family, some of whom were still running 10.04 at the time. As Ubuntu MATE started to become popular I saw an opportunity to capitalise on the Ubuntu brand to raise awareness of MATE and hopefully win some new users and ideally (much needed) contributors to the MATE Desktop project.

    The work I do for MATE Desktop and with the Debian maintainers team for MATE directly benefit Linux Mint MATE and LMDE. The effort I’ve put into Ubuntu MATE will be also useful in future versions of Linux Mint MATE, for example I’ve added first class MATE support to Ubiquity and just this weekend I’ve added proper Compiz support for MATE to the upstream Compiz project. My contributions to the upstream projects that Linux Mint builds on can only benefit Linux Mint in the long run.

    But it is not all one way traffic. Ubuntu MATE has also benefited greatly from Linux Mint in the guise of MATE Tweak (forked from mintDesktop) and MATE Menu (forked from mintMenu).

    I chat with Clem and we are on good terms but I am not suggesting there will not be some friendly competition between Ubuntu MATE and Linux Mint MATE. In fact, I think a little competition can only help both distributions improve and flourish.

    Love the show and I’ll be interested to hear you thoughts on the above 😃

  5. I’m the lead developer of Ubuntu MATE. I’ve been listening to mintCast since before I started working on Ubuntu MATE because, among other things, I’m a member of the core MATE Desktop team.

    Ubuntu MATE has been mentioned on mintCast a few times now and the sentiment is starting to imply that Ubuntu MATE intending to supplant Linux Mint MATE. This is not an objective of the project.

    The reason I started Ubuntu MATE was to recreate the traditional Ubuntu experience for my family, some of whom were still running 10.04 at the time. As Ubuntu MATE started to become popular I saw an opportunity to capitalise on the Ubuntu brand to raise awareness of MATE and hopefully win some new users and ideally (much needed) contributors to the MATE Desktop project.

    The work I do for MATE Desktop and with the Debian maintainers team for MATE directly benefit Linux Mint MATE and LMDE. The effort I’ve put into Ubuntu MATE will be also useful in future versions of Linux Mint MATE, for example I’ve added first class MATE support to Ubiquity and just this weekend I’ve added proper Compiz support for MATE to the upstream Compiz project. My contributions to the upstream projects that Linux Mint builds on can only benefit Linux Mint in the long run.

    But it is not all one way traffic. Ubuntu MATE has also benefited greatly from Linux Mint in the guise of MATE Tweak (forked from mintDesktop) and MATE Menu (forked from mintMenu).

    I chat with Clem and we are on good terms but I am not suggesting there will not be some friendly competition between Ubuntu MATE and Linux Mint MATE. In fact, I think a little competition can only help both distributions improve and flourish.

    Love the show and I’ll be interested to hear you thoughts on the above 😃

  6. Thanks guys for the podcast. Yes, Joe, there is a temptation to design for portrait style monitors. Ideal for working with documents in an office, I suppose. If it happens it will be to cater for most who can’t be bothered to turn their smartphone thru 90 degrees. And, yes, it would be nice if the media-player could automatically detect and adjust for this. It’s a pain to work thru VLC to find the option to select and turn the video thru 90 degrees. Great on the RPI granddad/grandson experience – I’m going to get one and this out.

  7. I thought it was really funny that I had the same views of Ubuntu Mate as someone else on the show. (Sorry I forgot his name). I am glad that Martin Winpress has cleared up the concern that Ubuntu Mate was not designed to replace Linux Mint Mate that was truly a concern of mine. As for the experience between grandfather and grandson that was something that really warmed my heart since my grandfather raised me as his own son and we were very close before he passed away. So I am very familiar with the importance of family and doing things together. Now as far as portrait monitors are concerned, why not just get one of those monitors that rotates into that mode or get an attachment that allows a standard monitor to be used in that way?

    • Intrigued, I had a look at the IMDB link… quote “The film is presented in an unheard-of 1:1 aspect ratio; the “viewing area” of the screen is a perfect square”. So the movie isn’t quite so extreme as a portrait aspect ratio, but it’s getting there 🙂 Good spot.

      • Oh..you’re right. Hadn’t read the description. At first glance it seemed to be what Joe was talking about..too bad.

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