Episode 38: Partitioning

The Linux Multimedia Sprint has been released!

Announcement

Torrent

News & personal updates

0:00:51 SiKing visited Canada

0:01:35 Google ditches Windows?

0:03:43 Google’s Chrome Computing System To Debut in Autumn

0:05:10 Qimo 4 Kids doesn’t have parental controls–use Mint 9 for parental controls

0:08:28 DesktopBSD has new development team

Partitioning

0:10:04 Intro to partitioning

0:12:52 Share data between Linux and Windows installs on same PC

0:14:08 Partitioning a Windows PC to install Linux

0:14:37 Defragment the Windows partition before resizing

0:16:54 Ready to install Linux

0:19:25 Why you should consider multiple partitions

0:20:21 Separate partition for /home

0:26:15 Other partitions you can set up separately

0:31:33 Separate partition for /data

0:40:30 How to edit and understand /etc/fstab

Web site of the week

0:40:55 X-bit labs

More info

Hosts: Charles, Rothgar, SiKing, Art Vanderhoff
Shared Google Reader: Charles, Rothgar
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[podcast]https://mintcast.org/wp-content/uploads/mintcast_published/mintcast038.mp3[/podcast]

[podcast]https://mintcast.org/wp-content/uploads/mintcast_published/mintcast038.ogg[/podcast]

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3 thoughts on “Episode 38: Partitioning

  1. Interesting info; thanx for the link. I especially liked the part about:
    “The hibernation feature (suspend-to-disk) writes out the contents of RAM to the swap partition before turning off the machine. Therefore, your swap partition should be at least as big as your RAM size.”
    followed further down below with:
    “High RAM and low disk space With 2 GB RAM and 30 GB hard disk, use 1 GB for swap since hard disk space is very low.”
    So, I still don’t know what to make of all this. :-
    I personally have 2GB of RAM and 1GB of swap. I have never had problems coming back from hibernate (although I do not use it that often, I am more of a suspend kinda guy), and I have never had my swap consumption go over 50% even when running multiple VMs.

  2. Hi Guys,

    You are producing an informative and easy to understand broadcast! Keep it happening.

    If you do really need Windows, the safest & easiest choice is install Mint Isodora and VirtualBox 3.2+ which will allow you too tame Windows vulnerabilities with ease by using Windows as a Virtual Machine. Now when Windows crashes only the VM dies & you can be back in Windows in a few seconds. There is also a noticeable speed improvement compared with standalone Windows XP.

    I use a WinXP Pro VM for Adobe Lightroom & Photoshop as well as the Windows software associated with my Lego Mindstorms Development. I have my Documents, Downloads & Programming partitions formatted to NTFS so I can access them from both Mint & the WinXP VM with no issues for the last 12+ months.

    I have used VMware Server, but have found that VirtualBox is the better choice for 90% of users. VB is quick & easy to install, as well as excellent documentation is provided. You do need to choose the non-free version to get access to USB devices & drives.

    The only failure I’ve had was after a power blackout which occurred while using my VM WinXP which corrupted the VM, but fortunately I had a back-up copy of the VM which made life easy. 5 minutes later I was downloading my photos from a CF Card to my USB External Drive.

    So Go to http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Linux_Downloads and get VirtualBox now!

    *** Make sure you add your Username to the VirtualBox Group. *** This will solve 99% of file & hardware access issues.

    VMWare once installed is good, but it’s not worth the headaches for the average user.

    regards

    Sparra

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